Many have centered their quest for weight loss on the intake of balanced diets, oblivious of the fact that weight loss doesn’t just have to do with the meal but also the timing of the meal.

Weight loss can occur unintentionally due to malnourishment or an underlying disease. It can also be caused by a conscious effort to improve an actual or perceived obese state. Weight loss that cannot be explained and which doesn’t result from a reduction in calorific intake or exercise is called cachexia. It could even be a symptom of a serious medical condition. Intentional weight loss, on the other hand, is a product of conscious effort and  is commonly referred to as  “slimming.”

The former may result from loss of body fats, body fluids,  muscle atrophy, or even a combination of these. It is generally regarded as a medical problem when at least 10% of a person’s body weight has been lost in six months or 5% in the last month.  Another principle for low weight assessment is the body mass index  (BMI). Conversely, decreased weight loss can be a cause for serious concern in frail elderly persons.

Weight loss in obese individuals can reduce health risks, increase fitness,  and may delay the onset of diabetes.

Intentional weight loss is a product of relentless efforts to improve fitness  and health through slimming. Weight loss in obese individuals can reduce health risks, increase fitness,  and may delay the onset of diabetes.  It can decrease pain and increase movement in folks with osteoarthritis of the knee. The restriction of calorie intake aids weight loss. More so, a balanced diet also regulates macronutrient consumption.

Out of the allotted daily calories, it is recommended that 55% should consist of carbohydrates, 15% of protein, and 30% of fats.  About 1,200 calorie diet is recommended to aid the supply of approximately 660 calories from carbohydrates, 180 from protein, and 360 from fat. Studies have shown that the consumption of more protein can help ease hunger pangs associated with reduced caloric intake by growing the feeling of satiety.

Also, times food is taken affect weight loss positively or negatively…

Also, times food is taken affect weight loss positively or negatively. You will agree with me that you have at different times found yourself in the kitchen late at night, devouring some sweet, salty or carb-rich treat even though you weren’t hungry. Studies have it that when food is consumed after dinner time or outside a person’s typical sleep/wake cycle — the body is more likely to store those calories as fat and add weight instead of burning it as energy.

The typical breakfast, lunch, and dinner routine can promote weight loss when each meal is big enough to leave you satiated. But your daily total calorie intake is lower than what you’d eat five times a day. Taking at least 30 grams of protein per meal will help maximize protein synthesis—a key strategy for protecting your hard-earned muscle while dieting. This meal structure can effortlessly translate into weight maintenance, as it follows social norms and is thus easily adaptable.

A new study by the International Journal of Obesity shows the aftermath with 420 overweight men and women in Spain who were watched on a 20-week weight loss program. The subjects were split into two groups. Each followed a similar diet, got equivalent amounts of sleep, and had similar caloric intakes and expenditures. They also showed no differences in two hormones that play a key role in appetite, leptin, and ghrelin.

But there was a critical difference in the timing of their main meal of the day…

But there was a critical difference in the timing of their main meal of the day, which in this case, because of the Mediterranean setting, was lunch. In both groups, the meal comprised about 40 percent of their daily calories. But one group consistently ate it before 3:00 pm daily while the other did so after 3:00 pm.

At the end of the study, despite similar caloric intakes,  the late eaters had lost significantly less weight. They also showed lower insulin sensitivity, which increases the risk of diabetes. According to the authors, weight loss strategies should focus not just on calories and nutrients, “but also the timing of food.”

The bottom line is that the timing of your meals may not be everything when it comes to weight loss, but it does play a role in it. But then, having a set meal plan, however, can make it easier to lose or maintain weight.

The bottom line is that the timing of your meals may not be everything when it comes to weight loss…

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